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    Sign language is something that the human brain can do very well with practice, but computers struggle to interpret it accurately. That obstacle did not deter KinTrans, who have been working to make it easier for deaf people to communicate with those who don’t know sign language, which of course, is most of us.



    It can be frustrating for deaf people to try to communicate when using public services or other businesses, sometimes having to resort to pen and paper or typing on a phone. With mobile messaging being the norm these days, it can feel like a very impersonal way to get your message across when you meet someone in person.

    KinTrans provides a more intuitive way to communicate, translating hand gesture and body movement into text and speech. This enables people to interact more naturally and positively, using the method of communication that each is most comfortable with.



    With help from an Expo Live Innovation Impact Grant, the next stage in development for KinTrans is to implement multilingual communication solutions to expand the usability of the system to more nationalities.